Chest Exercises

       

Chest Workouts For Men: The 10 Best 

Routines For A Bigger Chest


Overall Chest Mass

Training for mass is predicated on a few important principles. These include:
  • Beginning your workout with heavy multi joint movements
  • Hitting the muscle from a variety of angles
  • A high amount of overall volume (number of exercise, sets, reps)
The workout here follows a reverse-pyramid protocol, which allows you to take more total sets to muscle failure. It also starts with the dumbbell bench press rather than the barbell, because dumbbells are more difficult to control—extra difficulty is a good thing in this case—and allow for a greater range of motion. Many people find that just making that switch is enough to spur new growth.

Notes

  • Choose a weight that allows you to reach muscle failure by the target rep listed.
  • Lighten the weight for slightly higher reps on each set after your first 1-2 sets of each movement.
  • If you have a spotter, do a few forced reps on your heaviest set of each exercise, which should be your first or second set. If you don't have a partner, train as close to muscle failure as possible, and perform a dropset on your last set of each exercise.

1. Bench Press - Medium Grip Instructions

  1. Lie back on a flat bench. Using a medium width grip (a grip that creates a 90-degree angle in the middle of the movement between the forearms and the upper arms), lift the bar from the rack and hold it straight over you with your arms locked. This will be your starting position.
  2. From the starting position, breathe in and begin coming down slowly until the bar touches your middle chest.
  3. After a brief pause, push the bar back to the starting position as you breathe out. Focus on pushing the bar using your chest muscles. Lock your arms and squeeze your chest in the contracted position at the top of the motion, hold for a second and then start coming down slowly again. Tip: Ideally, lowering the weight should take about twice as long as raising it.
  4. Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions.
  5. When you are done, place the bar back in the rack.
Caution:
If you are new at this exercise, it is advised that you use a spotter. If no spotter is available, then be conservative with the amount of weight used.
Also, beware of letting the bar drift too far forward. You want the bar to touch your middle chest and nowhere else.
Don't bounce the weight off your chest. You should be in full control of the barbell at all times.

 

2. Incline Bench Press Medium-Grip




  1. Load the bar to an appropriate weight for your training.
  2. Lay on the bench with your feet flat on the ground, driving through to your hips. Your back should be arched, and your shoulder blades retracted.
  3. Take a medium, pronate grip covering the rings on the bar. Remove the bar from the rack, holding the weight above your chest with your arms extended. This will be your starting position.
  4.   Lower the bar to the sternum by flexing the elbows. Maintain control and do not bounce the bar off of your chest. Your lats should stay tight and elbows slightly drawn in.
  5. After touching your torso with the bar, extend the elbows to return the bar to the starting position.

 3. Decline Bench Press



  1. Lie back on a decline bench with the feet securely locked at the front of the bench. Using a wide, pronated (palms forward) grip that is around 3 inches away from shoulder width (for each hand), lift the bar from the rack and hold it straight over you with your arms locked. The bar will be perpendicular to the torso and the floor. This will be your starting position.
  2. As you breathe in, come down slowly until you feel the bar on your lower chest.
  3. After a second pause, bring the bar back to the starting position as you breathe out and push the bar using your chest muscles. Lock your arms and squeeze your chest in the contracted position, hold for a second and then start coming down slowly again. Tip: It should take at least twice as long to go down than to come up.
  4. Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions.

4. Dumbbell Bench Press




  1. Lie down on a flat bench with a dumbbell in each hand resting on top of your thighs. The palms of your hands will be facing each other.
  2. Then, using your thighs to help raise the dumbbells up, lift the dumbbells one at a time so that you can hold them in front of you at shoulder width.
  3. Once at shoulder width, rotate your wrists forward so that the palms of your hands are facing away from you. The dumbbells should be just to the sides of your chest, with your upper arm and forearm creating a 90 degree angle. Be sure to maintain full control of the dumbbells at all times. This will be your starting position.
  4. Then, as you breathe out, use your chest to push the dumbbells up. Lock your arms at the top of the lift and squeeze your chest, hold for a second and then begin coming down slowly. Tip: Ideally, lowering the weight should take about twice as long as raising it.
  5. Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions of your training program.

Caution: When you are done, do not drop the dumbbells next to you as this is dangerous to your rotator cuff in your shoulders and others working out around you.

Just lift your legs from the floor bending at the knees, twist your wrists so that the palms of your hands are facing each other and place the dumbbells on top of your thighs. When both dumbbells are touching your thighs simultaneously push your upper torso up (while pressing the dumbbells on your thighs) and also perform a slight kick forward with your legs (keeping the dumbbells on top of the thighs). By doing this combined movement, momentum will help you get back to a sitting position with both dumbbells still on top of your thighs. At this moment you can place the dumbbells on the floor.
Variations:
Another variation of this exercise is to perform it with the palms of the hands facing each other.
Also, you can perform the exercise with the palms facing each other and then twisting the wrist as you lift the dumbbells so that at the top of the movement the palms are facing away from the body. I personally do not use this variation very often as it seems to be hard on my shoulders.

5. Incline Dumbbell Press


  1. Lie back on an incline bench with a dumbbell in each hand atop your thighs. The palms of your hands will be facing each other.
  2. Then, using your thighs to help push the dumbbells up, lift the dumbbells one at a time so that you can hold them at shoulder width.
  3. Once you have the dumbbells raised to shoulder width, rotate your wrists forward so that the palms of your hands are facing away from you. This will be your starting position.
  4. Be sure to keep full control of the dumbbells at all times. Then breathe out and push the dumbbells up with your chest.
  5. Lock your arms at the top, hold for a second, and then start slowly lowering the weight. Tip Ideally, lowering the weights should take about twice as long as raising them.
  6. Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions.
  7. When you are done, place the dumbbells back on your thighs and then on the floor. This is the safest manner to release the dumbbells.
Variations: You can use several angles on the incline bench if the bench you are using is                                         adjustable.
Another variation of this exercise is to perform it with the palms of the hands facing each other.

Also, you can perform the exercise with the palms facing each other and then twisting the wrist as you lift the dumbbells so that at the top of the movement the palms are facing away from the body. I personally do not use this variation very often as it seems to be hard on my shoulders.

6. Decline Dumbbell Bench Press


  1. Secure your legs at the end of the decline bench and lie down with a dumbbell on each hand on top of your thighs. The palms of your hand will be facing each other.
  2. Once you are laying down, move the dumbbells in front of you at shoulder width.
  3. Once at shoulder width, rotate your wrists forward so that the palms of your hands are facing away from you. This will be your starting position.
  4. Bring down the weights slowly to your side as you breathe out. Keep full control of the dumbbells at all times. Tip: Throughout the motion, the forearms should always be perpendicular to the floor.
  5. As you breathe out, push the dumbbells up using your pectoral muscles. Lock your arms in the contracted position, squeeze your chest, hold for a second and then start coming down slowly. Tip: It should take at least twice as long to go down than to come up..
  6. Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions of your training program.
Caution: When you are done, do not drop the dumbbells next to you as this is dangerous to your rotator cuff in your shoulders and others working out around you.

If using really heavy weights, it is best if a partner gives them to you as you lay down.

Variations: You can use an exercise band or a barbell to perform this exercise.
Similar to the Dumbbell Bench Press but on a decline bench. This works more of the lower chest.


7. Cable Crossover



  1. To get yourself into the starting position, place the pulleys on a high position (above your head), select the resistance to be used and hold the pulleys in each hand.
  2. Step forward in front of an imaginary straight line between both pulleys while pulling your arms together in front of you. Your torso should have a small forward bend from the waist. This will be your starting position.
  3. With a slight bend on your elbows in order to prevent stress at the biceps tendon, extend your arms to the side (straight out at both sides) in a wide arc until you feel a stretch on your chest. Breathe in as you perform this portion of the movement. Tip: Keep in mind that throughout the movement, the arms and torso should remain stationary; the movement should only occur at the shoulder joint.
  4. Return your arms back to the starting position as you breathe out. Make sure to use the same arc of motion used to lower the weights.
  5. Hold for a second at the starting position and repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions.
Variations: You can vary the point in front of you where your arms meet.


8. Bent-Arm Dumbbell Pullover


  1. Place a dumbbell standing up on a flat bench.
  2. Ensuring that the dumbbell stays securely placed at the top of the bench, lie perpendicular to the bench (torso across it as in forming a cross) with only your shoulders lying on the surface. Hips should be below the bench and legs bent with feet firmly on the floor. The head will be off the bench as well.
  3. Grasp the dumbbell with both hands and hold it straight over your chest with a bend in your arms. Both palms should be pressing against the underside one of the sides of the dumbbell. This will be your starting position. Caution: Always ensure that the dumbbell used for this exercise is secure. Using a dumbbell with loose plates can result in the dumbbell falling apart and falling on your face.
  4. While keeping your arms locked in the bent arm position, lower the weight slowly in an arc behind your head while breathing in until you feel a stretch on the chest.
  5. At that point, bring the dumbbell back to the starting position using the arc through which the weight was lowered and exhale as you perform this movement.
  6. Hold the weight on the initial position for a second and repeat the motion for the prescribed number of repetitions.
Caution: If you are new to this movement, have a spotter hand you the weight instead. If not, please ensure that the dumbbell does not fall on you as you arrange your torso to perform the exercise on the bench.
Also, as I already mentioned, ensure that the dumbbell used is in perfect working condition. Old dumbbells in need of welding should never be used to perform this exercise.
Variations:
  • You can perform this exercise using a barbell or an e-z bar instead of dumbbells.
  • Also, if using dumbbells like Power block  just use a dumbbell on each hand with the palms of your hands facing each other.

9. Butterfly



  1. Sit on the machine with your back flat on the pad.
  2. Take hold of the handles. Tip: Your upper arms should be positioned parallel to the floor; adjust the machine accordingly. This will be your starting position.
  3. Push the handles together slowly as you squeeze your chest in the middle. Breathe out during this part of the motion and hold the contraction for a second.
  4. Return back to the starting position slowly as you inhale until your chest muscles are fully stretched.
  5. Repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.
Variations: You can use pulleys or an exercise band to perform this movement. Also, there is a variety of the Peck Deck Machine where you place your forearms on the pad, with the elbow and a 90 degree angle. You then squeeze your elbows together.


10. Push ups




  1. Lie on the floor face down and place your hands about 36 inches apart while holding your torso up at arms length.
  2. Next, lower yourself downward until your chest almost touches the floor as you inhale.
  3. Now breathe out and press your upper body back up to the starting position while squeezing your chest.
  4. After a brief pause at the top contracted position, you can begin to lower yourself downward again for as many repetitions as needed.
Variations:
If you are new at this exercise and do not have the strength to perform it, you can either bend your legs at the knees to take off resistance or perform the exercise against the wall instead of the floor.

For the most advanced lifters, you can place your feet at a high surface such as a bench in order to increase the resistance and to target the upper chest more.
Chest Exercises Chest Exercises Reviewed by Powerhouse fitness on September 05, 2018 Rating: 5
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